From birth we are encouraged to learn from our mistakes: get back in the saddle; go back and do it again; keep testing until it is right.  

So what happens,  sometime between late teens and early adulthood, that makes us so failure adverse?  Why do we forget that getting things wrong ensures that, ultimately, we will get them right, or does the fear of other people's judgement get in the way?

Somehow, somewhere between the end of formal learning and stepping on to the career ladder, we lose the power to explore our own ability and, in doing so, we rely far too much on the experience of others. 

But creativity and innovation rely as much on looking ahead as they do on reviewing the past.  True advance, whether in the world of science or the world of arts, needs free fall - a leap of faith into an unknown space where possible greatness (and equally possible failure) can occur.  

A world where development is based on the continual whittling of existing concepts is one that gets thinner and weaker. So we need a world which gives us the space to carve out new ideas if we want to grow and strengthen. 

There have always been mavericks who have stood against the tide, people who have effected real change.  Many of them are listed in the BBC piece attached.  Many of them failed and tried again (and again, and again).  All succeeded. 

We are not all mavericks however, and more (if not all) of us need to know we can, indeed are supposed to, strive for better, different, new ways of doing things (no matter how big or small).  We need to remember that ideas not working out first time is not a "full stop", but a chance to change direction, try again and move forward.  

And we need employers (and indeed clients) who give employees not just the confidence, but the time, to see new ideas pivot, change and take effect. 

I was recently asked by a client, during a creative pitch process, what are the ingredients needed to make an excellent client-agency partnership.  I asked for bravery and time. Experience teaches that my best work, best results, and longest term relationships have been with clients who are in it for the long ride, willing to go out on a limb.  Clients not blind to failure, but focused on success. 

Meanwhile, when the chips are down and times seem tough why not, like me, indulge in a bit of "failure porn"?  Read this article and imagine yourself JK Rowling or Sony, Walt Disney or James Dyson, Michael Jordan or The Beatles.  

It might be naughty but it feels oh so good.